We’re all better off when we have confidence in each other. Because that lets us choose the solutions that work for us all. But it takes effort to build that sort of confidence. And it means we need to act together, not unilaterally. It needs the global rules and institutions that we’ve built up so carefully, piece by piece, over seventy years, ever since the last time that mistrust between nations tore our world apart. In Europe, we understand that very well indeed. Because the whole history of the European Union has been a story of building trust between our nations. It's been a story of creating a Union of law, where the rules are the same for everyone, no matter where they’re from. And that has allowed Europe to prosper and succeed. -- Margrethe Vestager, The importance of being open – and fair, Harvard University, 2 March 2018
Margrethe Vestager
Posted by Isabelle le 2018-03-22
It's a particular pleasure for me to see that so many people here in the US take a genuine interest in the future of Europe. So let me say at once – that feeling is mutual. Europe and America do best when we work together. When you walk the Freedom Trail here in Boston – and hear the stories of the American Revolution – you can't help noticing that this nation was built on values that we share. Values of freedom, and fair treatment, and democracy, and the rule of law. And in today's very complex and challenging world, we should be building on that shared background, to help us meet our challenges together. Not trying to build barriers at each other’s expense. -- Margrethe Vestager, The importance of being open – and fair, Harvard University, 2 March 2018
Margrethe Vestager
Posted by Isabelle le 2018-03-22
It's a little late, perhaps, for new year’s resolutions. But I'd like to suggest that we all make one anyway: To do our bit to help Europeans get involved in building a bright future for Europe. -- Margrethe Vestager, Competition and the future of Europe speech, 17 January 2018.
Margrethe Vestager
Posted by Isabelle le 2018-01-26
The world is changing. But that doesn't mean the right way to respond is by changing our Union. By creating new institutions, drafting new treaties, producing new legislation by the barrowload. All those things might seem to carry the stamp of action. But they won't necessarily make people's lives better or help us play a more forceful global role. And the measure of our success in facing up to the future shouldn't be how much we change our institutions, but how much we change people’s lives, and improve everyone’s opportunities. -- Margrethe Vestager, Competition and the future of Europe, 17 January 2018.
Margrethe Vestager
Posted by Isabelle le 2018-01-26
It’s very moving to receive this honorary doctorate, here at Leuven University. Because in the nearly six centuries since the university was first founded, Leuven has shaped our map of the world. Sometimes literally. Many of us have a world map on the wall that uses a technique that goes back to Gerardus Mercator – or Geert de Kremer, as he was known when he first came to Leuven as a young man around 1530. -- Margrethe Vestager, Making globalisation work for Europeans, Honorary Doctorate Ceremony, KU Leuven, 23 November 2017
Margrethe Vestager
Posted by Isabelle le 2017-11-25
In The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, a computer called Deep Thought is asked to calculate the answer to the ultimate question, of Life, the Universe and Everything. For seven and a half million years, it runs its algorithm. Then it comes up with an answer. The answer to Life, the Universe and Everything, it says, is 42. Which just goes to show that asking the right questions is important, but understanding the answers matters even more. (...) In The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, the Guide in question was a sort of electronic book. Although it was often wildly inaccurate, it was also a huge success. That was partly because of the words printed in big, friendly letters on the cover: “Don't Panic”. I think that's good advice. We certainly shouldn't panic about the way algorithms are affecting markets. But we do need to keep a close eye on how algorithms are developing. We do need to keep talking about what we’ve learned from our experiences. So that when science fiction becomes reality, we’re ready to deal with it. -- Margrethe Vestager, 18th conference on competition, 16 March 2017
Margrethe Vestager
Posted by Isabelle le 2017-03-26
We all know that we are living in a historic time, and that our actions will have effects for generations to come. But we can't know exactly what effect we will have. All we can do is to trust in our values, and have the courage to act on them. -- Margrethe Vestager, Luther and the modern world, 14 November 2016
Margrethe Vestager
Posted by Isabelle le 2016-11-26
Everyone here will have noted that the European Union has had a lot of media coverage in the past months – and not all of it flattering. We have heard a lot about the Greek crisis and we have seen and heard about hundreds of thousands of refugees seeking shelter from war-torn areas, and many more displaced in neighbouring countries. Something which has given space to numerous articles, radio and TV coverage throughout not only Europe but the rest of the world. Europe’s responses are watched closely all over the world. And I believe that all our responses will have profound implications for Europe’s future and our place in the world. But beyond the news and the front page headlines, we also get a lot of work done. We do have a European Union that works; takes decisions; and delivers. But a working machine room generally does not make it to the headlines. This is something important both for Europe and for the rest of the World. Commissioner Vestager, The Values of Competition Policy, 13 October 2015
Margrethe Vestager
Posted by Isabelle le 2016-03-09