The European ideal took shape in the second part of the twentieth century. Although, at the time, the world was riven by animosity and fear, some were imaginative enough to envisage a future in which we were joined together by mutual interest, trust and affection. European values are the values that we advance in Ireland, within our European family, and in our relations with the wider world. Europe is one of the most successful political projects of the last century. So much has been achieved that once seemed the stuff of dreams. -- Leo Varadkar, Martens Lecture on the future of Europe, 26 April 2018
Leo Varadkar
Posted by Isabelle le 2018-05-05
As (Martens) said, ‘Young people today are more European and think European. They are our greatest resource to overcome scepticism, because they appreciate that you can now study anywhere, invest anywhere, work anywhere, and enjoy protection anywhere.’ Young people benefit most from European citizenship, and they know it. I was twenty-five when Martens said those words. Starting out on my own political career. They resonated with me because I saw in Europe a way of ensuring that Ireland developed economically, socially, culturally, and politically. It offered an opportunity for my country to finally achieve its destiny. So, since my student days, I have been a strong supporter of the European Union and European integration. -- Leo Varadkar, Martens Lecture on the future of Europe, 26 April 2018
Leo Varadkar
Posted by Isabelle le 2018-05-05
Alone, Ireland is small. Together with our partners, we are strong. -- Leo Varadkar, Martens Lecture on the future of Europe, 26 April 2018
Leo Varadkar
Posted by Isabelle le 2018-05-05
No other Member State is as closely entwined with the UK as Ireland. We are the only Member State to share a land border with the UK. We are bound together by geography and by centuries of shared history, culture and trade. We are friends. Many of us are family. -- Leo Varadkar, Martens Lecture on the future of Europe, 26 April 2018
Leo Varadkar
Posted by Isabelle le 2018-05-05
The Ulster poet John Hewitt famously spoke of his multiple identities - as an Ulsterman of planter stock, as Irish, as British and as European. He believed that we all have multiple identities, it's what makes us what we are. This is a strength, not a weakness; an opportunity, not a threat. It is something we should embrace about ourselves and about others, not something we should see as an impurity or a means of exclusion. It is at the very heart of the Good Friday Agreement - the right of the people of Northern Ireland to be British, or Irish, or both. And, of course, the right to be European. -- Leo Varadkar, The Future of Relationships North and South, 4 August 2017
Leo Varadkar
Posted by Isabelle le 2017-08-27