Welcome to this website devoted to the art of speeches in Europe today. Logos, pathos, ethos brings you some of the best quotes, speeches, and rhetorical tips. As its name suggests, this multilingual website is inspired by the long-standing European tradition of the art of speeches stretching back over twenty-five centuries. It seeks to shine a spotlight on speeches that matter on the European stage today.

Logos Pathos Ethos, July 2016

Dear speech-fans and -friends,


Different speakers, different audiences, different events, yet the same quote :

A politician is a man who thinks of the next election, while a statesman thinks of the next generation.

Together with its relevance for us today, this makes it our quote of the month.

If you want to find out who used it, read this month selection of quotes.

 

European speeches in June have dealt with – obvioulsy - the referendum in United Kingdom, but also history, Asterix and football.

 

You might also want to meet and learn from Sarah Hurwitz, Michelle Obama’s speechwriter – special thanks to Vital speeches for spotting this Washington Post article.

 

Logos, pathos, ethos will be back after the summer.

Have a fruitful break.

 

Isabelle

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Factfulness

Factfulness - Logos Pathos Ethos
Hans Rosling

Speakers often ask for numbers and statistic in speeches to support their message, but is quantifiable data the best idea in a speech? In a speech, ie not to be read with the eyes, on a screen or on paper, with the possibility to pause, analyze, and reflect, but heard by the ear, in a flow of words and sentences, with hardly any time or tool to p[...]
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Quotation of the day

« In politics, bridges are more important than walls, though we know how much easier and faster it is to raise a wall, than to build a bridge. -- Donald Tusk, Award of the honorary doctorate from the technical university of Dortmund, 16 December 2018, ... »
Donald Tusk
Posted by Isabelle
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Logos Pathos Ethos, June 2016

Dear Speech-fans and -friends,

Why does the art of speeches matter so much?

Speechwriter Simon Lancaster explains it quite well in his Ted talk: (watch:) Speak like a leader. It is becoming viral within the speechwriting community and for good reason.

This month harvest of speeches illustrates his point, by revealing once again the great potential of remembrance speeches, in Hiroshima, Verdun, or on Europe Day.

If you understand French, (écoutez:) La parole comme une arme: l'éloquence en politique. Cette émission radiophonique d’une heure est consacrée à l’éloquence de la politique française mais ses conclusions valent bien au-delà de l’hexagone. 

Enjoy this selection,

Isabelle

The point I’m making here is very serious : The reason we all used to learn rhetoric at school was because it was seen as a basic entry point to society. How could society be fair unless everyone had equal ability to articulate and express themselves ? Without it, your legal systems, your political systems, your financial sytems are not fair. It should be of intense concern to all of us that education in this has been narrowed to a very small and powerful elite (…)

Let’s revive rhetoric, let’s really reinvigorate debates around the world and let’s really give every child on the planet to become a leader.  What should we call this grand initiative ? Well here’s an idea. How about : democracy ?

(Full speech:) Simon Lancaster, Speak like a leader, April 2016 

Commemorating Europe Day

What has happened to you, the Europe of humanism, the champion of human rights, democracy and freedom?

What has happened to you, Europe, the home of poets, philosophers, artists, musicians, and men and women of letters?

What has happened to you, Europe, the mother of peoples and nations, the mother of great men and women who upheld, and even sacrificed their lives for, the dignity of their brothers and sisters?

(Full speech:) Pope Francis, Conferral of the Charlemagne Prize, 6 May 2016 (also available in Arabic, German, French, Italian, Polish, and Portuguese)

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Logos Pathos Ethos, May 2016

Dear speech-fans and -friends

As we celebrate Shakespeare on the 400th anniversary of his death

Look at Shakespeare: what are the great moments of his work? The sword fights?

No, the speeches,

when someone steps downstage and says, let me tell you what it is, let me tell you what it could be, lend me your ears.

The speeches, and the balcony scene. Those are the parts we remember.

Done right, a good speech can change the world. (…)


Here’s a secret a speechwriter can never forget: people don’t care that much about strategy, or sales goals or market share. They may say they do, but that’s not it.

They want to be inspired. They want to be part of something meaningful and big. And our job is to show them what that feels like.

Every speech is a hero’s journey. But the hero isn’t the speaker up on the stage.

No, no, no.

In our theater, the hero is the man or woman out there in the audience looking for something that will (…) finally let them become the person they long be.

Dain Dunston, The Downside of Up: The Outrageous Fortune of Being a Speechwriter, 2016 Cicero Speechwriting Grand Award, delivered at the 2015 World Conference of the Professional Speechwriters Association

 

Want more speeches ? Read this monthly selection and the best of the 2016 Cicero Speechwriting Awards.

Want more inspiration ? Join the 2016 World Conference of the Professional Speechwriters Association. PSA offers a special 15% discount to Logos, Pathos, Ethos readers with the code LPE15.

Enjoy this selection,

Isabelle


Perhaps you need an outsider, somebody who is not European, to remind you of the magnitude of what you have achieved. 

President Obama, Address to the People of Europe, Hannover, Germany, 25 April 2016

 

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Logos Pathos Ethos, April 2016

Dear speech-fans and -friends,

Most of the speeches this month have a common theme:

From H-D Gensher’s most famous quotation that we recall as he just passed away,

to European current affairs,

to forward-looking speeches delivered in places of former divisions, in Cyprus and between the United States and Cuba,

to George Clooney’s reminder of how to deal with giant numbers.

This common theme is refugees.

This selection is completed by Al Gore’s Case for optimism and shines a spotligh on some of the best rhetorical devices,

and a few lines from Imre Kertész’s Nobel Lecture Eureka - on the occasion of his passing away on 31 March 2016 - as an invitation to explore Nobel Lectures.

Looking forward to your comments and reactions, 

Isabelle


Numbers numb.

It’s too much to talk about giant numbers.

It’s actually easy to dismiss giant numbers.

But it’s very hard to dismiss a young child sitting on the ground crying when her mother’s telling the story about how she left.

G. Clooney - of refugee descent (sic) - meeting Syrian refugees, 15 March 2016

 

Former German Foreign affairs Minister H-D Gensher’s most famous quotation

(English below)

Wir sind heute zu Ihnen gekommen, um Ihnen mitzuteilen, dass heute Ihre Ausreise…

We have come to you today, to announce, that today, your leaving the country …

H-D Genscher, to 4500 East-Germans who had sought refuge in the German Embassy in Prague, 30 September 1989

To refresh our memory on this speech: The Guardian

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Logos Pathos Ethos, March 2016

Dear speech-fans and friends,

The art of speeches is an old enough discipline to keep us from believing the challenges we face are totally new to mankind.

Looking back to history, we can find in leaders confronted to dangers and difficulties some wisdom, vision, and inspiration.

And good stories. And good quotes.

This month’s harvest provides a few examples.

Isabelle

 

 

If you read only one speech this month, read this one

by Umberto Eco,

delivered in 2012 when he received the Treaties of Nijmegen Medal.

To decide and recognize what, in a tolerant vision, would remain intolerable for us, is the kind or borderline that Europeans are called to trace every day, with a sense of equity and with the constant exercise of that virtue that, since Aristotle, philosopher called Prudence.

In this philosophical sense, prudence does not mean reluctance to take risks, and does not coincide with cowardice. In the classical sense of phronesis, prudence is the ability to govern and discipline oneself by the use of reason.

Umberto Eco, receiving the Treaties of Nijmegen Medal, 7 May 2012

 

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