It is my real pleasure to welcome you today to Lisbon and to host this event. I am particularly proud of the setting, which could not be more relevant. Portugal's history is so intertwined with the history of the Atlantic Ocean. My first memories as a child are overlooking the ocean with my father hand in hand. My father used to tell me stories about the oceans, scientists and philosophers. … -- Carlos Moedas, Signing of the Belém Statement, 13 July 2017
Carlos Moedas
Posted by Isabelle le 2017-08-27
Harari in his book Sapiens explains why Homo Sapiens was the only human species to survive. Why the Neanderthals disappear. And he says: ‘The wandering bands of storytelling sapiens were the most important force the animal kingdom had produced.’ (…) Collectively we need to be more vocal about our stories. We hesitate too much to tell our stories to the broader public (…). I want to encourage you to tell them to everyone. Tell them to your friends and families. Publish them in newspapers. Write letters to politicians and tell them. Tell them so that everyone can see how important and how beautiful science can be. -- Carlos Moedas, The power of storytelling in science, Tel Aviv, Israel, 17 May 2017.
Carlos Moedas
Posted by Isabelle le 2017-05-28
But why does this matter to us? Why should we care what happens to science in other countries or on other continents? The answer is simple: science belongs to everyone and serves all of us. -- Carlos Moedas, Why I am marching for science, 21 April 2017
Carlos Moedas
Posted by Isabelle le 2017-04-22
The current lack of public and political engagement in fact-based decision-making even has people asking, have we have entered a "post-factual" era of democracy? One in which the public identifies with populist rhetoric and decisions are made based on fears and assumptions, because people feel science and politics have left them behind. -- Carlos Moedas, Europe's voyage towards an open global research area, EuroScience Open Forum, 25 July 2016
Carlos Moedas
Posted by Isabelle le 2016-08-28
Ladies and gentlemen, never underestimate the power of how you are, and will, transform people's lives. It's no small thing to show the world that what's always been done, can be done better. So, spread your story far, wide and fast! Even the smallest of patient innovations can bring hope and happiness! Commissioner Moedas, 13 July 2015, Sharing Solutions, Improving Life through Citizen Innovation
Carlos Moedas
Posted by Isabelle le 2016-03-09
Jocelyn had helped to build a radio telescope that recorded signals from very distant parts of the universe, as well as radio interference from man-made transmitters. One day, she was looking at a 3 mile long print out of all this information, when she found a patchy pulsating signal, which she amplified. Blip. Blip. Blip. The signal was constant and strong. Aliens perhaps? Months later, while still trying to make sense of these pulses, she detected another patchy signal. Blip. Blip. Blip. At 3:00 in the morning, before she left for Christmas holidays, she rushed out to get the cold telescope working for just 5 minutes at full sensitivity. The signal was the same, but faster and from a completely different part of the sky. This couldn't be aliens. Jocelyn had discovered … (To find out what she discovered and why we should) Never forget these stories (go the full speech) Commissioner Moedas, Recognising the Contribution of Women to Science, 24 September 2015
Carlos Moedas
Posted by Isabelle le 2016-03-09
Kept indoors during the French revolutionary years − and in search of a worthwhile distraction − a young Parisian called Sophie Germain turned to studying her father's library. From intellectual works like Montucla's Histoire des Mathématiques, Sophie soon discovered a deep love and a remarkable talent for mathematics. Though her alarmed parents took away her warm clothes, and refused to light a fire in her bedroom, Sophie wrapped herself in blankets and continued to study mathematical theorems into the night by candlelight. (…). Ladies and gentlemen, though every barrier imaginable was thrown in her path, Sophie Germain succeeded through hard work and perseverance: educating herself, hiding her true identity and withstanding the social pressure to conform to traditional expectations. What I take from her story is that there have always been barriers to thought and innovation, but those barriers can be overcome. Commissioner Moedas, Innovation Potential in the Digital Age, 21 October 2015
Carlos Moedas
Posted by Isabelle le 2016-03-09
If you didn't migrate then your father did, and if your father didn't need to move from place to place, then it was only because your grandfather before him had no choice but to go, [to] put his old life behind him in search of the bread that his own land denied him... José Saramago, quoted by Commission Carlos Moedas, Understanding migration: the role of research for policy and society, 4 February 2016
Carlos Moedas
Posted by Isabelle le 2016-03-09